Series’ unfortunate conclusion satisfies expectations

Baudelaire story comes to an end

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Series’ unfortunate conclusion satisfies expectations

Fair use from Netflix

Fair use from Netflix

Fair use from Netflix

Fair use from Netflix

Jenna Cook

Season three of Netflix’s “A Series of Unfortunate Events” brings about the end of the tale of Baudelaire orphans Violet, Klaus and Sunny. And despite the show’s constant urging of the viewer to look away, I couldn’t slow myself down.

The season starts exactly where the last one ended — on the edge of a literal and figurative cliff. This helps maintain continuity within the timeline of the story since all the characters are exactly where viewers last saw them. However, it may be wise to rewatch at least the last couple episodes of season two to completely remember everything instead of having to pause and fill in the blanks.

As season three facilitates the introduction of new characters as well as letting go of old ones, it wastes no time delving into mysterious events that were never expanded upon in earlier seasons. The addition of Kit Snicket (Allison Williams) provides a link to the narrator of the story, Lemony Snicket (Patrick Warburton) and their late brother, Jacques Snicket. Kit’s role in the story gives context to a number of flashback scenes, which allows several major plot points to gain clarity. She also serves as a connection to the Baudelaires’ dead parents.

The general moody feel of the show has managed to stay consistent over the course of its three seasons. However, the newest installments use more mature humor to appeal to a wider variety of audiences, dropping in subtle lines that will raise eyebrows among teens and adults. These jokes likely go over the heads of younger viewers, but the writers have kept them in mind as well, including references and jokes they can understand and appreciate. This made the show fun to watch by providing these fun tidbits.

Although “A Series of Unfortunate Events” was adapted from a children’s series of novels, many of the themes and images are surprisingly mature. The characters often speak in complicated sentences and share their individual experiences of traumatic events. Additionally, the deaths of several characters in the new season as well as past ones continue to provoke emotion. The showrunners have managed to develop the ensemble — including minor characters — in a way that humanizes them, increasing their relatability.

Over the course of three seasons, viewers have been able to watch Violet (Malina Weissman), Klaus (Louis Hynes) and Sunny Baudelaire (Presley Smith) grow up. Their development as characters and as actors is palpable in this last season, all three of them having clearly matured both onscreen and off.

Although I would have loved to continue following the story of the Baudelaires and their endeavors, I could not be more satisfied with the conclusion of this show. It provides closure while simultaneously leaving the futures of many characters up for interpretation. Over the course of its three-season run, “A Series of Unfortunate Events” has provided continual joy for me. While the story has evidently concluded, I am overjoyed with the ending the Baudelaires were given.

A Series of Unfortunate Events: ★★★★☆

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