Stricter driving laws will affect students

Hands-free law aims to save lives

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Stricter driving laws will affect students

Photo Illustration Carissa Prestholdt

Photo Illustration Carissa Prestholdt

Photo Illustration Carissa Prestholdt

Ben Sanford

It affects me because of simple things, like doing directions, so I always have to have that ready immediately before I go. According to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety, the new Hands-Free Law has been in effect since Aug. 1. 

It affects me because of simple things, like doing directions, so I always have to have that ready immediately before I go. ”

— Lauren Whiteman

This means no driver is able to touch a phone in any capacity while in drive. 

Driver’s education instructor Allison Luskey said there are other ways to answer calls in a safer way.

“Now it has to be voice activated, set your directions before you operate the car, those kinds of things,” Luskey said. 

Junior Lauren Whiteman said she notices the changes the Hands-Free Law has created and doesn’t find it difficult to adjust her behavior. 

“It affects me because of simple things, like doing directions, so I always have to have that ready immediately before I go,” Whiteman said.

According to Luskey, phone usage while driving is an issue for all ages.

“Making sure drivers know that when you’re in the driver’s seat, the priority is safe driving,” Luskey said. “It’s important for us to recognize that something needed to change.”

Whiteman said the Hands-Free Law is an easy way to make the roads safer.

“I don’t really think there’s anything unreasonable about the law because it’s not really that hard to just not go on your phone,” Whiteman said.

Senior Jacob Brown said this law will keep drivers more aware of police.

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