Oriole Study Nest remains open during hybrid learning

Outlet for students available for distance learners

Junior+Nathan+Hausladen+participates+in+his+forth+hour+class+from+the+Oriole+Study+Nest+Jan.+19.%C2%A0%C2%A0The+Oriole+Study+Nest+will+remain+open+to+students+during+their+distance+learning+days.

Jayde Classen

Junior Nathan Hausladen participates in his forth hour class from the Oriole Study Nest Jan. 19.  The Oriole Study Nest will remain open to students during their distance learning days.

Molly Schochet

In an effort to give more support to students, Park opened the Oriole Study Nest this fall as a place for them to come in and get work done without the distractions at home. Senior Nick Lanoux said the Study Nest has allowed him to do just that, while also allowing him to meet up with friends.

“It was really helpful to just have somewhere to go, where you can focus, get your work done and then I also had a few friends that went there too, so it wasn’t just like you’re by yourself,” Lanoux said.  

As Park transitions to hybrid, the Study Nest will remain open for students who are not in person that day, and on Wednesdays, according to assistant principal Jessica Busse.

“The numbers will be limited because space will be limited, but it is available, and we are asking that students reserve a spot through that Student Support App,” Busse said. 

Although she has not yet used the Study Nest herself, junior Olivia Kelly understands how it can be very useful to her peers and believes it was a smart decision to keep the Study Nest open.

“There’s food provided, there’s resources and people to help you when you’re there,” Kelly said. “You can be self-sufficient at home, but being at school and in that area would probably be super helpful to a lot of people.”

Lanoux said he is excited for the growing flexibility students have in controlling how they learn best and how the Study Nest can now contribute to that.

Everyone’s homelife is different and everyone has different things going on, so just a place where they can go and get away from everything to get work done and not have to worry about anything else is beneficial to most people”

— Nick Lanoux

“Everyone’s homelife is different and everyone has different things going on, so just a place where they can go and get away from everything to get work done and not have to worry about anything else is beneficial to most people,” Lanox said. 

Allowing students to find where they work best while they are in high school also sets them up for success later in life, according to Busse. 

“I’m excited that students are getting that opportunity and it’s also preparing you for the real world when you are going to have to choose what is the best environment for you to be productive,” Busse said. 

Kelly said keeping the Study Nest open will be beneficial to students, especially during asynchronous periods. 

“It’s basically a study hall, you can go there and be with friends because friends can also go down in the same hours, or you can go to whatever teacher you need to actually be in for that hour,” Kelly said. 

Overall, Lanoux said he is happy with the decision to keep the Oriole Nest open, as it is a valuable asset to many students. 

“If it’s beneficial to some students they should do it,” Lanoux said. “It’s a good way for kids to get help and get their work done.”