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The Echo

The student news site of St. Louis Park High School

The Echo

The student news site of St. Louis Park High School

The Echo

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Screening ‘Screenagers’: significant or shallow?

Was Park’s showing of ‘Screenagers’ effective?
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In an era where technology constantly influences our lives, it’s important to talk about the issues teenagers face. Park recently showed “Screenagers: Under the Influence” to all Park Connections classes, a movie meant to teach kids about the dangers of drugs in the digital age. This was a good step, but it got me thinking about whether this is really the best way to reach teens today.

There’s no denying the good intentions behind showing this movie to students. In a world increasingly intertwined with technology, raising awareness about the risks associated with digital drug exposure is essential. The movie serves as a conversation starter, bringing attention to a topic often ignored or misunderstood. It’s a basic way to begin educating teens about these serious issues, which is definitely needed. In my class, we talked about our personal experiences with technology and how it aligns with or differs from the scenarios presented in the movie. We mostly described how the situations were unrealistic for the majority of teenagers, but that it’s good to shine a spotlight on the rare cases when it does happen.

However, the method of using “Screenagers: Under the Influence” to convey this crucial message has its limitations. While the film presents some impactful examples and is well-intentioned, its style might not be the most effective in capturing the attention of a teenage audience. The message, though valuable, risks being distorted by a medium that might not quite resonate with students. Sitting in class watching this video isn’t going to affect an individual’s life significantly or change their behaviors. A better way to engage teens and encourage them to reflect on their previous experiences might be through detailed, focused discussions with active participation and personal reflection. In this more personal setting, talking with other teens and teachers, students would be more likely to change certain behaviors than they would be just viewing a distant, general video. In my class, we mentioned how the movie wasn’t really effective at making change, and a more intimate discussion could achieve something greater.

Park’s decision to screen “Screenagers: Under the Influence” for all Park Connections classes was a commendable step towards addressing the challenges faced by teens. However, the film, though informative, might not fully resonate with a teenage audience. More personal and real conversations where we can all share our own stories and thoughts could resonate deeper. This kind of talk, where we can actually relate and discuss things openly, would help us understand these issues better and make us think more about our choices.

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About the Contributor
Noah Leventhal, Digital Content Editor
Hi there! I'm Noah, a senior, and this is my third year on Echo. I'm super excited to take on the role of Digital Content Editor this year, making sure the website is in tip-top shape 24/7. I also manage our social media presence, working to expand Echo's reach as far as possible. When I'm not designing pages or writing stories for Echo, you'll find me enjoying movies, games, and occasionally playing ultimate frisbee.

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