Question whiteboard sparks dialogue

Students voice their opinions

Senior+Michael+Ramirez+picks+Pepsi+over+Coke+on+the+white+board+Nov.+18+outside+of+A308.+Chemistry+teacher+Alexander+Polk+asks+a+new+question+on+the+board+each+day.+

Molly Schochet

Senior Michael Ramirez picks Pepsi over Coke on the white board Nov. 18 outside of A308. Chemistry teacher Alexander Polk asks a new question on the board each day.

Colin Canaday

Walking through the A3 hallway, students are greeted each day with questions ranging from how do you pronounce “caramel” to preference between Pepsi and Coke products.

These questions, created by teacher Alexander Polk, are intended to help engage students, according to Polk.

“(It allows students to) give some feedback on different things around the world,” Polk said.

Sophomore Will Dooley said he believes it allows students to be more expressive.

“It’s really for interacting with students and making more of a personal connection between educators and kids.”

According to Polk, he employs the question board in order to break up the monotony of class.

“Sometimes there will be an overwhelming answer and sometimes the argument will carry into class a little bit, which allows students to talk to each other in a different way, not just about chemistry,” Polk said.

Dooley said the question board helps make the school environment more lively.

“I think it’s fun. It makes it more than just learning, which makes it more enjoyable,” Dooley said.

It’s really for interacting with students and making more of a personal connection between educators and kids.”

— Will Dooley

According to Polk, he usually stays away from heavier topics, but the board inspires conversation within his classroom.

“Usually (the questions are) pretty trivial and not super important, like ‘cheese or chocolate?’ or ‘is Batman a superhero?’ which aren’t a huge deal, but it’s a fun way to come into class,” Polk said.

Sophomore Asher Danicic believes the question board helps people get in the right mindset before class.

“It’s a fun way to get people thinking and talking at the start of class. It of course is optional so no one has to do it, (but) a lot of people have fun adding their own things.”