Math teachers continue unicycle training

Students express concern about lack of teacher participation

Math teacher Meredith Webster's unicycle sits in her classroom Feb. 9. Webster is one a few teachers still learning to ride the unicycle.

Lukas Levin

Math teacher Meredith Webster's unicycle sits in her classroom Feb. 9. Webster is one a few teachers still learning to ride the unicycle.

As some math teachers progress learning to ride unicycles, sophomore Grace Farley said she is confused by the message.

“I think it’s just kind of weird. It doesn’t make any sense to me. The whole point of it was to show that if you try something, then you’re going to get good at it,” Farley said. “They’re not showing anyone that they’re actually trying.”

Math teacher Robert Otto introduced the idea for teachers to learn how to ride the unicycle at the beginning of the school year, in hopes it would motivate math students.

Meredith Webster, a math teacher participating in the task, said a lot of her fellow math teachers stopped doing the challenge.

“I don’t think it really impacted anything within the math department. Some people kind of stopped doing it, partially because of fear of injury,” Webster said.

Farley said she currently sees no point in the whole matter since she personally hasn’t seen any of the math teachers ride their unicycles.

“I think it’s stupid. I don’t think it serves a purpose. No one sees them learning how to do it. They just do it like by themselves in an empty hallway,” Farley said. “They’re not promoting that they’re doing it. If they promoted it, it would be better.”

Sophomore Morganna Oberdorfer said she thinks the idea is fascinating but would also like to see more from the department.

“I think it’s cool. I think it’s cool that they are trying hard at something that they couldn’t do when this first started. Although I would like to see more of it.” Oberdorfer said.

Webster said she hopes her students are being impacted by the math department’s training.

“I don’t know if it has impacted any of my students. I would hope that it would have,” Webster said. “Sometimes students are impressed that we were able to learn how to ride a unicycle, but other than that, the goal was to encourage them to be persistent in their math homework.”

Farley said their message may have had a bigger impact with a different approach to students.

“If I were one of the math teachers, I would take video and show it to my class, with the other teachers,” Farley said. “I would show it at the end of the month to show our progress. Like a montage at the end of the year.”

 

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